Close
Close

No products in the cart.

What clothes to wear on an off-road expedition ?

What clothes to wear on an off-road expedition ?

Let’s take a closer look at all that matters when selecting the right set of clothes for your next Off-Road Expedition.

 

In a previous series of articles covering the basics of off-road driving for beginners, I dedicated a chapter to equipments. However, as nothing deserves more attention to details than your equipment, I intend now to dive in this topic further more, with specific articles dedicated to the various kits I bring along while traveling to remote locations.

Before giving you lists of what I carry with me, I’ll try to dissect the various concepts at play so you can make “educated” decisions on your own. Taking my recommendations at face value, following my lists blindly, will only bring disappointments if you don’t understand the reasons behind my own choices.

Every item should fulfill a need, perform a specific function, not follow a trend, or a particular sense of esthetics. Combining them takes time doing thorough technical research, requires a certain experience coming after trial and errors, takes into accounts personal needs and taste, and it deserves adjustments depending on the various environments and conditions you will encounter.

Let’s start today with clothing.

Now, since I’m a man I tend to lack valuable experience in women clothing. As such the list of clothes I bring along given at the end of this article will have its obvious limits for you ladies. Nevertheless, all the concepts behind my choices will help girls reading this post adjust accordingly when it comes to their own needs.
(Also, I’ll be more than happy to fill the void if you want to contribute to this blog and give your input as a female explorer !)

Women outdoor clothing line by © Craghoppers

 

Table of contents


 

Introduction

What to wear on a trip should be simple when considering what is expected of clothing.

  • Keeping us warm in cold weather.
  • Keeping us dry in wet conditions.
  • Keeping us cool in hot conditions.
  • Protecting us from the rays of the sun.
  • Being durable and functional enough to withstand the beating of outdoor exploration.

(Notice I didn’t include looking like a badass rambler ! Yes look matters, but as a cherry on a cake, not as the sole engine of your decision process !)

However, as soon as we dig a bit deeper in each requirement, while looking for the most adapted item, we are faced with conflicting concepts of physics forcing unwanted compromises in our choices.
You want to stay dry ? Ok, how do you combine the need to keep water from coming in as you need your own sweat to breath out ?
To choose the gear that will perform the best at handling those opposite tasks, you first need to understand your own body thermo-regulatory system, get a clue about fiber performance (natural or synthetic), then learn how to layer them on you for the ultimate result.

Let’s start the class.


 

How does your body work ?

  • For survival and maximum efficiency your inner body temperature is kept at 37°C. The actual human range being between 36.5°C and 37.5°C, 37°C being the average. In order to keep that temperature steady regardless of the outside elements, our body is equipped with clever internal regulating solutions based on the basic concepts of conduction and convection (heat transfer).
    In other words, when confronted with a cold environment, to prevent a sudden blood temperature drop, our cardiac system reduces its blood flow in the areas most subjected to cold exposure, like our feet, hands, or head. Deprived of that vital blood flow, those limbs then tend to turn blue.
    If that is not enough we then begin to shiver, instinctively engaging a movement of the body to generate some form of heat, just as we would more effectively if we were to jump around our feet and clap our hands high above our heads. (Now, anyone who had to suffer through a night of shivering crawled deep inside his or her sleeping bag while waiting for the sun to finally rise up, will attest to the limits of this mechanism, and I won’t be the one to argue with them.)
  • It’s the opposite phenomenon when faced with excessive heat, may it be from our own physical activity or outside temperature. Our blood is then pushed towards the surface of our skin hoping to cool off while in contact with the ambient air. We’re now turning red (which explains the water tap colors in case you ever wondered !)
    But as this is rarely enough, especially when confronted with outside heat, the body employs a second cooling procedure called sweating. First though vapors, then with liquid. It is the evaporation of that liquid on our skin that provides the cooling effect. (I’ll spare you the physical and technical explanation behind the concept as I don’t want to turn this into a full on physics class, so just trust me or go-ahead google it!)

Two things we can get out of that knowledge:

  • The importance of temperature transfer through ambient air.
    • As conflicting temperatures try to find a common ground, where heat naturally cools off when mixed with colder air, it is worth noting that it remains stable when insulated within small, non-convecting areas.
    • When trying to stay warm the body protects itself by creating a space between its core warmth and the outside cold. Recreating those intermediary insulating spaces through layers of clothes is one of the key concepts in our fight against temperature depletion.
  • The importance of moisture in the cooling process.
    • By sweating, we cover our skin with liquid which then cools us off by “evaporating”. Choosing a garment that absorb our sweat and spread it through the fibers of its fabric for a rapid and efficient evaporation help maximize our own cooling abilities.

How does that translate to clothes ?


 

Fabrics & Fibers

Yeah, I know what you’re thinking before we even get started. You went to a store, grabbed an outdoor shirt and realized a Ph-D in synthetic fiber technology was required to avoid getting lost in translation while comparing the various materials it was made of, and what they were supposed to do ? As if trying to figure out the chemical ingredients in our food wasn’t problematic enough?

Am I gonna have all the answers ? No ! Every brand has its own terms, trademarks and heavily marketed confusing BS trying to persuade you it is what you need, whatever you may need. And to be fair, they get away with it because it’s easier selling something useless and expansive to confused customers than to one who actually knows what he or she really needs !! Which is why you shouldn’t expect their catalogues to clarify things up for you, as they hide behind pompous superlatives instead of facts. Or even sales people to guide you as they so often lack the proper training or information themselves. (What ? You think I’m mean or obnoxious saying that ? Go to a Nike Store and start asking specific questions in regards to your next marathon training shoes based on your weight, foot morphology and expected mileage, and get back to me !)

One way to avoid being confused is to get to know the basic fibers used in the textile industry.

Two main groups to begin with, Natural and Synthetic (sometimes they trick you by mixing a bit of synthetics with natural, like lycra and cotton for example)

It’s not as clear cut as organic versus MGO to stay within the food analogy. You have great characteristics in both categories, it’s all a question of understanding how they work and how to use them appropriately.

  • Natural:
    • Hemp (starting good!)
    • Linen
    • Silk
    • Cotton
    • Wool

Those have been available to us for centuries and have proven their values time and time again. Outside our western world they are still the only one most people use and perform perfectly for them, even those living under very harsh conditions. They are highly breathable, great when it comes to insulation and absorption and have an un-imitable feel on our skins, no synthetic fabric can match. Which is why it is fair to say that many of us already have most, if not all, we need to travel inside our own closets. Shirts, sweaters, pants, gloves, jackets, made of those fibers.

I’ll go over the characteristics of the main three: Cotton, linen and wool.

  • Cotton
    Cotton is often the most popular choice when it comes to garment fabric. Yet it can’t be said that it is the best choice on the market. Yes, it absorbs sweat like no other fabric, but because it absorbs so much, as the liquid soaks the fibers instead of “running” or “floating” on it, cotton doesn’t dry very fast. As such, a cotton T in cold climate can turn into an unwanted chilling factory. Also, once soaked, cotton weights on you, taking away your first insulation layer, between your skin and the fabric. Finally, once soaked up, it constrains your movements. It feels like its glued on you but not moving along as it should. I use it for pants, I avoid them as tops.
  • Linen
    A better choice is Linen. It’s cooler just on the touch. It’s due to a better “conductivity” to quote wikipedia. Like all natural fabrics it absorbs moisture effectively. However it doesn’t feel damp like cotton once wet and dries very quickly, making it a great choice for warm climates. Now because it is used mostly for hot climate garments which tend to be made thinner, the finish product is not as durable (strength) as its cotton equivalents. As such it is less recommended for pants, specially in cool temperatures where cotton remains the better choice.
  • Wool
    Wool is even better at it, as it takes a lot of water for wool to actually soak up. 30% of its weight can be wet before your start feeling it. It’s due to wool fiber structure and its reaction to moisture. When moist fibers crawl up to each others in a way that creates tiny air pockets within the fabric, allowing for insulation. It’s also far more flexible and durable than cotton. Because of it’s moisture absorption, wool is always “lubricated” enough so it won’t brittle with time. All that explains why wool is not only used in sweaters and socks or gloves but also as a base layer option. It’s even used in very thin garments in warm climates. Can’t beat insulation plus moisture retention.

Now, because we always feel the need to search for better (and charge for more), we constantly try to improve those ancestral fibers with more capable modern supplements, the synthetics.

  • Synthetic:
    • Polyamide aka Nylon
    • Polyester
    • Polypropylene
What more do they bring ?
  • Strength.
    They are supposed to be stronger, aka more durable. More comfortable to movement with the introduction of stretching materials like lycra or Spandex, (often also mixed with natural bases like cotton).
  • Wicking.
    Synthetic fabrics are in general hydrophobic. Aka they don’t absorb water. Ever worn a nylon or polyester shirt at a disco revival ? Then you know what I’m talking about ! Nylon is bad, Polyester is worse, and polypropylene is even worse in that regard. What they do instead, at least the one used in modern outdoor garments, is allowing the moisture to pass trough their fibers, thanks to specific micro fiber assemblage and clever fiber structure angles, and run over, or spread over, the fabric surface, instead of soaking its core like a cotton t-shirt would. There is a term for that, it’s called wicking. In practical terms, your sweat is being conveyed from your skin to the surface of the fabric where it will evaporate and dry faster. That fiber property is called Hydrophilic. In all fairness it is often achieved or emphasized by a chemical treatment applied on the fabric, instead of the fabric internal properties. It means that the added chemical layer (Usually made by DuPont) sprayed on will eventually wash-off leaving you with a far less effective garment.
  • Water resistant yet breathable.
    They are also supposed to be more breathable while being water-proof. (like Gore-Tex) How ? Hard to explain how Gore-Tex works. Those are heavily protected trademarks. It’s like trying to give you the recipe for the Big Mac sauce or what’s inside a Coca Cola beside way too much sugar !
    In a nut shell it is a PTFE (Teflon laminate) membrane made of 2 or 3 layers on the outside, which property is to be block water in its liquid form, but let it through in its vapour form. As such protecting you from the outside rain, while letting the heat vapors from inside get out. On the inside of that membrane you’ll find a classic polyester lining.
  • UV resistant & Insect repellant.
    Finally they can resist UV rays and repel insects, thanks to chemical add-ons most often provided by DuPont.

But not a single fiber combines all those attributes, which is why you need to diversify into a clever layering system.


 

Layering

So how does the layering systems works and and how can you take advantage of the fabrics we just went over ?

In the old days, humans protected themselves with animal skin or fur. It can be argued that it is still the most efficient way to stay warm, as Eskimos in the Arctic make for a very convincing case. However, it tends to be a bit cumbersome and only gives you two thermal options. Either hot when you have it on, or cold if you take it off, with no proper gradient in between. The other smart way to go at it, is to create a layering system being lighter to wear, more responsive and more adapted to the wide spectrum of temperature degrees. Each layer (think of an onion) should target a specific purpose and be added or removed based on the changing thermal conditions. Each layer should also allow a small amount of air to be “trapped” between them as explained above, for the purpose of insulation.

Here are the core ensembles that compose a well conceived layering system.

Base layer.

Those are the garment touching your skin. Their role is to regulate moisture and keep it away from your skin. Remember that liquid evaporation cools you off. It’s great in hot climates, can be deadly in freezing conditions. If you sweat because of intense physical movements, get that base layer soaked without the option of drying quickly as it evaporates the water surplus, once you stop that physical activity that wet garment will keep its chilling effect instead of warming you up. Chilling in the Arctic isn’t what you bought that underwear for, is it ?

  • The most common natural fibers used in base layer garments are cotton and wool.
  • The synthetic fiber most often used in base layer garments is polyester.
  • In warm climate, I just skip it. The less I wear, the less I’m bothered.
  • In cold climate, I use wool under-garments. Wool has an incomparable feel to the skin and as mentioned above combines all the right attributes to keep you warm thanks to it’s natural insulation properties while absorbing moisture and being highly breathable.
Mid-Layer(s).

A mid layer worn above the base, typically a shirt, a fleece, a sweater, pants, etc… They provide insulation while being functional, comfortable, and durable. Here again the choice of fabric is key as the vapor and liquids soaking the base layer need to pass trough this second layer to reach the outside.

  • The most common natural fibers used in mid layer garments are cotton, linen and wool.
  • The synthetic option are Polyamide, Polyester synthetic mixes. Clothes made with those are often more functional since made by companies targeting travelers and designing them for that purpose (more pockets, venting outlets, etc). You’ll see a lot a Elastane or lycra (stretch) included in the fabric mix (even with cotton), particularly for pants to make them more comfortable.
  • In warm climate, I favor linen. It keeps me cool, dries in no times, and is durable (If you are “respectful”). Now linen tends to “wrinkle” easily when it dries but still makes you look “smarter” in town than an all synthetic look.
  • In cold climate I use wool shirts and wool sweaters. Nothing beats wool in my opinion. I have two type of sweaters depending on temperature. A thin one and a warmer cashmere, both cardigans. Sticking to my natural fiber preference I use heavier cotton “khakies” over my wool underpants.
    The synthetic equivalent are made of polyester fleece shirts or sweaters, or fleece lined polyester /polyamide pants. Under extreme conditions, pants fall into the outer-Layer category where Gore-Tex like Teflon membrane or Polypropylene options are available.
Warm-layer.

Obviously doesn’t apply to warm climates as the mid layer will do the job just fine.
This is wear I go Synthetic.

  • In cold climate this is the down jacket often made of a synthetic shell and of goose feathers or a synthetic equivalent insulation. It keeps you extra warm while still being breathable. It should be a very light, easily folded down-jacket made with a Polyester or Polyamide synthetic shell and inside insulation (Feather or synthetic equivalent). I prefer the all synthetic option, as it is worth noting that goose feathers we find inside those garments loose their insulation properties when damped. (This applies to sleeping bags just the same). By using synthetic I stay warm no matter what humidity level I’m confronted with.
Outer-shell layer.

This is the last layer, the jacket or pants that keep the wind and rain out. It is insulating, breathable and water-proof while remaining light.

  • In warm climate. Most likely you won’t need anything more than a thin wind breaker like a K-way, or a linen vest.
  • In cold climate. This is what keeps me dry and protects me from the cold winds. The fabrics of choice are synthetics like Gore-Tex or brand equivalents made of expanded PTFE mixed with polyester and Polyamide mix and linings.

Voilà ! Now that I have gone over the basic thermo regulatory concepts, the basics of main fibers used in our clothes, and the reasoning behind an effective layering system, time to give you my detailed list of travel clothes I have used in the past few years depending on the main environments I have been in.


 

What clothes do I bring along ?

From what you have read so far, you probably noticed I have a slight preference for natural fabrics. I also like to use what I already have in my closet instead of having to go buy new specific items that will only serve one purpose. Now, traveling being a lot more than sweating in the outback, I also like clothes which won’t look incongruous in town, at a restaurant, a museum, etc… Most importantly, I bring as little as I can, that means I stick to what is essential and forget about the rest, as weight is always a concern for any traveler. The following list tends to reflect that and is why I told you earlier it should be adjusted based on your personal tastes (and gender) as long as you follow the concepts described above.
Last thing I must say before getting down with the list. Because I take pride in buying good stuffs and pay attention to what I buy, they tend to last. As such, when trying to find the links for them on internet, I realized that most were no longer on sale, having been replaced by newer designs. I have then tried to link equivalent products.

Hot Climate expeditions
like the Arabian Al Hajar Traverse and the Oman Trail.

  • Running short (base layer):
    • Basic marathon type running shorts. I use them for various tasks. As swim trunk, exercise short, sleeping short, washing short. I could use them as underwear, only if I wore underwear. (I know too much information here!)
  • Two pairs of socks (base layer):
    • Beige cotton socks. Only use them with my Red Wing shoes. Avoid the white ones as they look dirty faster than you can wash them.
  • Two shirts (mid-layer):
    • Custom made linen long sleeve shirt with two frontal pockets I can close with buttons.
      I’m not saying custom made to sound like a snob, but having the opportunity (and it ain’t that much more expensive) choose the exact fabric weight and color, the pocket layout, all that with a perfect fit, is something you can’t argue against !
      On top of that I can wear it to town without looking like I have been on an expedition.
    • Craghoppers Nosilight long sleeve shirt.
      What I like about the Craghopper shirt is its ability to dry in minutes and not wrinkle, its clever venting system and very useful pockets. The collar rising up to protect your neck from sunburns is also a great addition.
      The long sleeves protect my skin from the undesired effects of the sun.
    • What I don’t recommend:
      T-shirts, polos or short-sleeve shirts. They lack pockets and don’t protect you from the sun effectively.
  • Two pair of pants (mid-layer):
    • Linen straight cut beige pants with pockets I can close.
      – Straight cut because I want comfortable pants that don’t obstruct my movements.
      – Beige because it’s always a good idea to match the color of dirt you’re gonna be in. Saves you useless washing.
      – With pockets I can close because nothing is worse than loosing your car key in the sand, as you bend over trying to set up camp.
    • What I don’t recommend:
      – Cargo pants. The side pockets, whether you use them or not, are not very comfortable when you are sitting in a car all day.
      – Shorts. For the same reason I don’t have short sleeve tops. The sun is not a friend in these climates.
      – Military clothes. Yes they are durable and well thought of. But never a good idea to look like someone straight out of the US Marine Corp when trying to pass through a border in the Middle East.
  • Belt (pants accessories):
    • Nato fabric belt. Cheap, durable, fast drying.
  • Key chain (pants accessories):
    • A climbing python or similar. Always have your keys hooked on you. Avoids having them in your pockets where they could fall off as you move around.
  • One Sweater (warm-layer):
    • Wool cardigan.
      Based on what I explained earlier a sweater should be considered a mid-layer, but in the desert I use it as the warm layer. As such I have a fairly warm one for when temperatures really drop in the evening.
  • One Jacket (outer-shell layer):
    • A smart or obvious choice would be a plain K-way or a wind breaker. It does the job great, weights close to nothing and can be folded away easily. Instead I carry a Saharienne. (This is a good example of personal versus rational choice factor)
      My reason is because it hardly ever rains in the desert, and winds are warm here, not cold. Plus I use it as my first warming layer before it gets cold enough for my sweater, or on top of it if really it gets chilly. Also, as mentioned above I like to avoid the modern western explorer look and instead use everyday clothing items.
      The Saharienne is classy and functional with its many pockets.
  • Two pair of shoes: (outer-shell layer):
    • When in the mountains I wear my Red Wing Hawthorne Muleskinnner leather Iron Rangers. They are extremely comfortable (once you have taken the time to break them to your feet!) never make your feet feel the heat and will last for ever.
    • When at camp or just in the desert sands I wear my Ancient Greek leather sandals.
    • What I don’t wear:
      Sneakers. Despite my love for Salomon shoes, they don’t last long with the beating, make your feet hot and get full of sands in no time.
      Regular flip flops. They are easier to put on that my greek sandals and will dry faster if you get them wet. They are also a lot cheaper. So why not ? I’m tired of having to buy new ones each year, and they don’t look too smart when you are in town.
  • Scarf (accessories):
    • Bedus and locals have been wearing on their heads the traditional Ghatra for centuries for a reason. Don’t try to reinvent the wheel, just follow the wise men. (Just have to learn how to put it on, and then you’ll never leave home without it)
  • Bandana (accessories):
    • Serves so many purposes ! Should be on everybody’s list !
  • Watch (accessories):
    • This is vey personal. I have a Tudor Ranger. Why do I like it. It is simple, does the job, won’t attract unwanted attention and runs without battery. I use it with a nato fabric bracelet that can be washed and dries fast.
      What I like less. Not cheap, and not ultra precise with time (Go faster than it should by about Five minutes in a month, at least mine)
  • Glasses (accessories):
    • I’m nearly blind, I need my glasses. I have Ray Ban look alike. Sturdy, does the job. As sun glasses, Ray ban Caravan. Again very basic. Important to carry a spare. If they break I can’t read a map, a road sign or even my car controls.
      Whatever sunglasses you pick, get real sun lenses. Those with valid UV protection.
  • Bag (accessories):
    • (This is not my expedition bag, just my everyday multi purpose bag I always cary with me.)
      Us army bag. Practical, light, what else do you need from a bag ? I must say that the ones without the US letters on it are best. Again the military thing at borders, being associated with the US is not always a good thing ! A Pakistani never believed I was French after seeing the US letters on my bag, instead thought I was working for the CIA. Not a good thing !
    • What I don’t recommend.
      Backpacks. They make your back sweat, people can open them behind you without you noticing.
  • Work clothes (accessories):
    • You are on a vehicle expedition. At some point you may have to work on your car. Might want to protect your clothes from oil and other dirt. I bring along a cheap utility cover-all that I keep with the rest of my tools.

—————

Temperate to Cold Climate expeditions
like the Scottish Highlands expedition.

  • Running short (base layer):
    • Basic marathon type running shorts. I use them for various tasks. As swim trunk, exercise short, sleeping short, washing short.
  • Climate Control Underwear (base layer)
    • Odlo makes great synthetic undergarment. Merino has its wool equivalent.
  • Two pairs of wool socks (base layer):
  • Two shirts (mid-layer):
    • Custom made wool long sleeve shirt with two frontal pockets I can close with buttons.
      Again nothing to do with being a snob, but just as with the linen shirt, having the opportunity to choose the exact fabric weight and color, the pocket layout, all that with a perfect fit, is something you can’t argue against !
      On top of that I can wear it to town without looking like I have been on an expedition.
    • Craghoppers Nosilight long sleeve shirt.
      Because it is not always that cold I use the same shirt I use in hot climates for the warmer days
      What I like about the Craghopper shirt is it’s ability to dry in minutes and not wrinkle, it’s clever venting system and very useful pockets. The collar rising up to protect your neck from sunburns is also a great addition.
      The long sleeves protect my skin from the undesired effects of the sun.
  • Two pair of pants (mid-layer):
    • Cotton Khalies straight cut dark brown pants with pockets I can close.
      – Straight cut because I want comfortable pants that don’t obstruct my movements.
      – Dark brown because it’s always a good idea to match the color of dirt you’re gonna be in. Saves you useless washing.
      – With pockets I can close because nothing is worse than loosing your car key in the dirt or water, as you bend over trying to set up camp.
    • What I don’t recommend:
      – Cargo pants. The side pockets, whether you use them or not, are not very comfortable when you are sitting in a car all day.
      – Military clothes. Yes they are durable and well thought of. But never a good idea to look like someone straight out of the US Marine Corp when trying to pass through a border anywhere.
  • Belt (pants accessories):
    • Nato fabric belt. Cheap, durable, fast drying.
  • Key chain (pants accessories):
    • Always have your keys hooked on you. Avoids having them in your pockets where they could fall off as you move around.
  • One Sweater (mid-layer):
    • In this case the sweater is a mid layer. I use a cashmere type for extra warmth.
  • One Down-Jacket (warm layer):
  • One Jacket (outer-shell layer):
  • Two pair of shoes as options: (outer-shell layer):
  • Scarf (accessories):
    • Cashmere scarf
  • Bandana (accessories):
    • Serves so many purposes ! Should be on everybody’s list !
  • Watch (accessories):
    • This is vey personal. I have a Tudor Ranger. Why do I like it. It is simple, does the job, won’t attract unwanted attention and runs without battery. I use it with a nato fabric bracelet that can be wased and dries fast.
      What I like less. Not cheap, and not ultra precise with time (Go faster than it should by about Five minutes in a month)
  • Glasses (accessories):
    • I’m nearly blind, I need my glasses. I have ray ban way fairer look alike. Sturdy, does the job. As sun glasses, Ray ban Caravan. Again very basic. Important to carry a spare. If they break I can’t read a map, a road sign or even my car controls.
      Whatever sunglasses you pick, get real sun lenses. Those with valid UV protection.
  • Bag (accessories):
    • (This is not my expedition bag, just my everyday multi purpose bag I always cary with me.)
      Us army bag. Practical, light, what else do you need from a bag ? I must say that the ones without the US letters on it are best. Again the military thing at borders, being associated with the US is not always a good thing ! A Pakistani never believed I was French after seeing the US letters on my bag, instead thought I was working for the CIA. Not a good thing !
  • Work clothes (accessories):
    • You are on a vehicle expedition. At some point you may have to work on your car. Might want to protect your clothes from oil and other dirt. I bring along a cheap utility cover-all that I keep with the rest of my tools.

—————

Cold climate expeditions
like the Arctic Circle rally during winter.

It would be pretty much the same as the previous example, only with a warmer outer shell jacket like a Eider Mountain Ski Jacket, special cold weather pants like the Eider Ski pants, warmer gloves like Eider winter gloves and special snow shoes the Salomon Mid 2 Spikes GTX.


 

Conclusion

I hope all this information will help you get a better sense of what you might need for your next trip, and more importantly, what you won’t need as less is often more !!
Please send me your feedback and your personal observations as we all get better by sharing in a civilized manner our knowledge.
If interested in going deeper, I strongly recommend you dig into the amazing “Vehicle dependent expedition guide” by the legendary Tom Sheppard, which was a gold mine for this article research and where you’ll find even more detailed analysis on this always evolving subject.

Happy Travels

Cover picture © Craghoppers + Born & Raised

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Close